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Fish Quiz

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Anonymous
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Fish Quiz

Hello 

I had aquarium's all my life.. ( i was born above a aqua/terra shop runned by my grandfather). 

Ok another quiz to keep you busy.

This is an African Fish.  What is the name?

 

Pheonix's picture
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Correct dan, just an everyday Marine Scallop >>>

Scallops are edible bivalves similar to oysters and clams. They are found both in bay waters and in the sea. They do not attach themselves to a permanent anchorage, but move themselves through the water by opening and closing their shells. As a result, the muscle that controls the 'hinge' of the shell is much larger than that of oysters or clams.

The whole of the organism is edible, and in Europe, they are eaten in their entirety like oysters. In the US, however, only the shell muscle is eaten and it is this white cylinder of flesh that is commonly thought of in America as a scallop. The flavor is sweet and delicate, and is best served with a mild sauce of cream, cheese or butter that will not overpower the subtle flavor of the scallop itself.

Scallops are both fished and 'farmed' (that is, cultivated in water for harvest). Since they cannot survive out of water, they are shucked from their shells on board the fishing boat.

The bay scallop is much smaller than the sea scallop, and the edible muscle is less than an inch in diameter; usually a half-inch (about a centimeter) or smaller. The sea scallop's muscle can be as large as two inches (about 5 centimeters) in diameter. Sea scallops are sometimes cut into smaller shapes to pass as bay scallops. A 'faux scallop' made of shark is also available.

The scallop shell is the most familiar of shell-shapes; Shell Oil uses its distinctive fan-shape on all their service station signs. The shell is the symbol of the apostle James, and 'coquilles St. Jacques' means 'shells of St. James'. Crusaders of the Order of St. James wore a scallop shell as a sign of their allegiance.

The scallop shell is also associated historically with the cult of Venus. Botticelli's painting, the Birth of Venus (the famous 'Venus on the half-shell') shows the goddess apparently emerging from a scallop shell. She is actually arriving on land from her birth at sea on a scallop shell boat, driven to shore by the wind-gods Zephyr and Chloris.

P.S. Dan, Give us an answer to " Who am i #21

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dan loves zebras's picture
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Its gotta be a scallop but i wouldnt have a clue which species?

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Pheonix's picture
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  I live in salt water although i have relations that also live in brackish water, i am a Marine Invertebrate, i feed mainly on Plankton.

I also taste quite good from the frying pan.

What am i called>>>  

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dan loves zebras's picture
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Correct the africain catfish or barbel! i think i spelt that right... can be seen feeding of scrapes whilst crocs are still eating there prey... and some species of catfish can grow to 6 feet!

pheonix its your turn to do a quiz!

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dan.

Pheonix's picture
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 I'll try again Dan. Is it a >>>>

 

Clarias gariepinus or African catfish
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dan loves zebras's picture
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Nope this fish is much bigger and moves across the land to get to water when mudholes have dried up Smiling

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Pheonix's picture
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 Well Dan. lets see now >>> Could it be, >>>>

 

Mudskipper
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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MudskippersMudskippers in The Gambia
Mudskippers in The Gambia
Scientific classificationKingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Actinopterygii
Order:Perciformes
Family:Gobiidae
Subfamily:Oxudercinae
Genera

Apocryptes
Apocryptodon
Boleophthalmus
Oxuderces
Parapocryptes
Periophthalmodon
Periophthalmus
Pseudapocryptes
Scartelaos
Zappa (genus)

Mudskippers are members of the subfamily Oxudercinae (tribe: Periophthalmini[1]), within the family Gobiidae (Gobies). They are completely amphibious fish, uniquely adapted to intertidal habitats, unlike most fish in such habitats, which survive the retreat of the tide by hiding under wet seaweed or in tidal pools.[2] Mudskippers are quite active when out of water, feeding and interacting with one another, for example to defend their territories.

They are found only in tropical and subtropical regions, including all the Indo-Pacific and the Atlantic coast of Africa.

Contents[hide]

[edit] Adaptations

Compared with fully aquatic gobies, these fish present a range of peculiar behavioural and physiological adaptations to an amphibious lifestyle. These include:

  • The ability to breathe through their skin and the lining of their mouth (the mucosa) and throat (the pharynx). This is only possible when the mudskipper is wet, limiting mudskippers to humid habitats and requiring that they keep themselves moist. This mode of breathing, similar to that employed by amphibians, is known as cutaneous air breathing.[2] Another important adaptation that aids breathing are their enlarged gill chambers, where they retain water. These large gill chambers close tightly when the fish is above water, keeping the gills moist, and allowing them to function. They act like a scuba diver's cylinders, and supply oxygen for respiration also while on land.[2]
  • Digging of deep burrows in soft sediments that allow the fish to thermoregulate;[4] avoid marine predators during the high tide when the fish and burrow are submerged;[5] and for laying their eggs.[6]
Periophthalmus gracilis (from Malaysia to North Australia)

Even when their burrow is submerged, mudskippers maintain an air pocket inside it, which allows them to breathe in conditions of very low oxygen concentration.[7][8][9]

[edit] Species

The genus Periophthalmus is by far the most diverse and widespread genus of mudskipper. Seventeen species have been described.[10] Periophthalmus argentilineatus is one of the most widespread and well known species. It can be found in mangrove ecosystems and mudflats of East Africa

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dan loves zebras's picture
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Im am not good with fish i know a few things but do you know which type of fish can crawl over land i do Smiling this is quite easy though anyone want to guess?

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Iceage (not verified)
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Pheonix wrote:

Well done, you are learning.

 

Yippie !!!

so now Dan has an oportunity to ask us a question!

Go Dan ! Go!

 

Pheonix's picture
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Joined: Nov 8 2007

 

 Correct Dan, they all have two scalpel like barbs which can be opened out to 45 degrees, when threatened they reverse towards their opponent slashing the tail from side to side causing extreem damage almost always fatal.

I know this from experience, i inserted a Yellow Tang into my salt water marine tank, next morning i had 4 expensive marine fish all floating at the top of the tank and the Yellow Tang proudly swimming the length of the tank, an expensive lesson to learn.

If you look at the above picture of the Yellow Tang, you can see one of his / her scalpels in a closed position, just at the wrist of the tail.

Well done, you are learning.

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