Friday 15th December cam discussion

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Anonymous
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Friday 15th December cam discussion

New day Smiling

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"Gerda" wrote:
goodnight all, I'll go to bed so the lion can come to the waterhole ! see you tomorrow !

Goodnight Gerda - wow! was that a lion call I heard, or maybe a hyaena?

Cool

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"Gerda" wrote:
goodnight all, I'll go to bed so the lion can come to the waterhole ! see you tomorrow !

Good night!
*waits for the lion*

Anonymous
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"Gerda" wrote:
goodnight all, I'll go to bed so the lion can come to the waterhole ! see you tomorrow !
Night to you, yesterday's girl. Sticking out tongue Have a good night and weekend!

Anonymous
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goodnight all,
I'll go to bed so the lion can come to the waterhole !
see you tomorrow !

Anonymous
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"Tabs" wrote:
"BenODen" wrote:
I'll have to hunt up my source... I could swear that both causes were at play. The extreme voltages and temperatures really are crazy for sure. If only we could capture the energy for use!

I am sure that you must have seen trees that have taken a direct hit from lightening? The damage that this does to a tree can be spectacular - but is limited to the tree splitting along it's trunk and maybe, but not always, a branch falling.
...

I haven't seen that many direct hits, even after the fact. But I guess I have seen more with that scar down them than entirely splintered trunks, so you must be right, but I could have sworn that I'd read about the tree debris from a fairly authoritative source. Anyway, yeah, electrocution, very bad. No trees for me. *grin*

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"BenODen" wrote:
I'll have to hunt up my source... I could swear that both causes were at play. The extreme voltages and temperatures really are crazy for sure. If only we could capture the energy for use!

I am sure that you must have seen trees that have taken a direct hit from lightening? The damage that this does to a tree can be spectacular - but is limited to the tree splitting along it's trunk and maybe, but not always, a branch falling.
This in itself would not cause the death of anyone standing under the tree unless they were unfortunate enough to be standing under, and directly hit, by a branch that split off.
This scenario would come under the heading of 'being in the wrong place at the wrong time' whereas it is always extremely risky, whatever the place and time, to shelter under a tree during a thunderstorm due to the (very) high risk of being electrocuted.

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"Tabs" wrote:
"BenODen" wrote:
One thing that kills people is the exploding tree... I wonder if there's a chance that the lions reaction times are so fast that he gets out of the way... seems unlikely though... It's only 10s of milliseconds between strike and explosion, I think...

Actually, it is not the 'exploding tree' that kills people - it is the 'electric shock' and heat that passes down the tree, into the ground and through anyone who is standing within about 5 metres of the base of the tree.

A direct cloud to earth (or tree) lightening strike produces from 100 million to 1 billion volts and the temperature of the strike can be up to 50,000 degrees Fahrenheit, fours times as hot as the sun's surface.

In other words, anyone who is standing under a tree which takes a direct hit is fried!
I'll have to hunt up my source... I could swear that both causes were at play. The extreme voltages and temperatures really are crazy for sure. If only we could capture the energy for use!

Anonymous
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"BenODen" wrote:
One thing that kills people is the exploding tree... I wonder if there's a chance that the lions reaction times are so fast that he gets out of the way... seems unlikely though... It's only 10s of milliseconds between strike and explosion, I think...

Actually, it is not the 'exploding tree' that kills people - it is the 'electric shock' and heat that passes down the tree, into the ground and through anyone who is standing within about 5 metres of the base of the tree.

A direct cloud to earth (or tree) lightening strike produces from 100 million to 1 billion volts and the temperature of the strike can be up to 50,000 degrees Fahrenheit, fours times as hot as the sun's surface.

In other words, anyone who is standing under a tree which takes a direct hit is fried!

Anonymous
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I started new day thread Laughing out loud

Anonymous
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Horses and cows get killed by lightning in Florida, whilst standing under or near trees.

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