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What duck is this?

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Anonymous
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What duck is this?

I'm from the US. Not sure what bird/duck this is.
Can someone educate me?

It is at the watering hole.

Thanks!

http://i11.tinypic.com/2ymevxx.jpg

Julie
Buffalo, NY
USA

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modsquad
Joined: Mar 14 2006

"limpopo" wrote:
You're welcome - I really like the Wildwatch site. Check this out on their site - maybe I should also put it on the reading thread.

http://www.wildwatch.com/annual/default.asp

I just looked, that looks a nice book!!! thanks for this, I signed up for the emails Laughing out loud

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Anonymous
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You're welcome - I really like the Wildwatch site.
Check this out on their site - maybe I should also put it on the reading thread.

http://www.wildwatch.com/annual/default.asp

Ingwe's picture
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modsquad
Joined: Mar 14 2006

Thanks for that Limpopo. I learn something everyday Smiling

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Anonymous
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Here is some info I came across:

When is a goose not a goose?
In spite of their names, the Egyptian, spur-winged and pygmy geese are not geese, but ducks. There are, in fact, no true geese south of the Sahara. True geese lack iridescent plumage and have an irregular, net-like surface to the tarsus (that part of the leg between the 'ankle' and 'knee').

Ducks (except for the whistling ducks), on the other hand, have horizontal plates or scales on the tarsus, and many species have iridescent feathers on the wing.

Walk like an Egyptian
The Egyptian goose is an unmistakable and sometimes unavoidable bird! Noisy and aggressive, it commandeers natural pans and lakeshores, and has adapted extremely well to man-made waterholes and dams.

It occurs throughout Southern Africa and is the only member of the Anatidae to breed both north and south of the Equator. It now occurs in very large numbers in Johannesburg parks, and breeds in all months of the year. Some 30 000 are estimated to occur on the Highveld, with large winter aggregations forming on bigger pan systems. Smaller numbers occur in the sub-tropical lowveld.

There can be little doubt that the creation of artificial waterbodies such as farm dams has allowed this species to expand both in range and numbers. The Egyptian goose feeds on grass, seeds, aquatic rhizomes and crop seedlings.

The nest is a natural hollow on the ground, or more typically in woodland areas - a disused stick nest of another bird. The huge thatched nest of the hamerkop is frequently used as a nesting site, much to the dismay of the hard-working builders!
http://www.wildwatch.com/resources/birds/ducks.asp

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Egyptian Goose is in the tribe of Shelducks. Apart from many duck-like characteristics, they also have external goose-like features. They are often bred in captivity.
http://www.treknature.com/gallery/North_America/United_States/photo11254.htm

Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

Oh cool!!! Thanks!

Julie

Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

Hi Julie,

That's an egyptian goose.
Alopochen aegytiaca

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