Monday, 1 Januari 2007, cam discussion

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Anonymous
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Monday, 1 Januari 2007, cam discussion

Laughing out loud Happy New Year to all at Nkorho

Anonymous
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Thank you for that. That was very helpful. I now envy those at the lodge even more!! Living here in Florida, I've been to Animal Kingdom a million times over, and always head to the safari ride. If only it could be truly real like Karin's! Not much of a substitute. The description of the average day is definitely one to dream of. But for now, I'll have to settle for the little glimpse I get of what those there at the lodge see all around them )

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Hi, this was posted by Karin who is the main cam op and will give you some insight.

Hi to All webcam addicts.
My (Karin) typical day normally begins about 05H00 and starts off with me checking that the camera is working and that the equipment is streaming. I am also addicted as I have to check your posts of the evening before to see what I have missed during the night. In the past I normally left the camera at about 08H00 and taught school to 2 children at the lodge, but now my job description has changed and I have become the Manageress of the lodge.
During the period that I am teaching the camera is normally operated by one of the rangers on duty. A rangers day starts at 04h30 and the first game drive departs at 05H00 and is about 3 hours long they then return have breakfast and take the guests on a bushwalk. After the guests return from this they spend some time in our pool admiring the game on the open area. The afternoon game drive departs at 17H00 and is out for 3 hours once again. They return have dinner under the African stars around a campfire.
After school has ended for the day I once again return to maning the camera and check what I have missed during the morning session. During the evening the camera duty is shared by all parties working at the lodge. The last guests normally go to bed by 22H00 and the camera is then not maned until I return in the morning.
I will be going on Leave on Friday for the Christmas Holidays and will return just before the New Year. I wsh you all many hours of great viewing. MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR

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Anonymous
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?
Perhaps this has been posted somewhere else before, but I am curious about the camera operators. They do such a fantastic job. Are they all on site there at the hotel? Do they normally operate the camers 24/7? I'm just curious who might know more about them. Thanks.

Anonymous
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Bronco mentioned the little guy's existance. Our seeing him gave us a reason to remember that we're talking about wild things here. The laws of nature will rule, all the animals need to eat. Bronco, you had a good way of putting all this.

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"Bronco" wrote:
This is a rare chance to see something that many "urbanites" (aka city people) have completely left behind and forgotten.

As an 'urbanite' and city-dweller I would argue that we have not left behind, or forgotten, the dynamics of wildlife......as a small sample of how we can observe the web of life, we have our garden birds (the male Robin, for example, will attempt to kill any other male that challenges him for his fiercely defended territory, the urban fox is always on the lookout for small mammals on which to feed and you only have to take a little time to observe the insects and arachnids to understand that life and death are very interconnected, whether in the bush or in your own back garden.

We may have seen lion and hyaena kills on Nkorho recently but anyone, wherever they live, can witness events which are equally dramatic in their own way, in their own back yards!

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New Thread

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Anonymous
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On the subject of sick and weak animals:
If by chance, we saw a mother cheetah, starving, nothing but skin and bones and she had two juvenile cubs with her, we would be praying for her to get a sick wildebeest or any kind of prey.

I would take this site for what it is.. a glimpse into how wildlife behaves. Wildlife behavior will not change for us, so we must accept the fate of the weak and dying; even if an animal dies for no particular fault of its own; at the same time we should understand that the predators at the top of the food chain are part of a very delicate balance that is required for an ecosystem to stay "healthy"

If you get emotional about baby Zebras and other juvenile animals, you should try your best to remain rational. Each species has its own particular strategy for survival, the strong and fit will outlive the others and reproduce the most. It is a shame that the wildebeest was injured, it may have been a freak accident, birth defect, or wound from a predator. Human emotions are understandable, all babies are extremely cute and attractive. But for whatever reason some juveniles perish.

This is a rare chance to see something that many "urbanites" (aka city people) have completely left behind and forgotten. There will be beautiful moments of peace and serenity on the pan, and those moments can turn into savage brutality or senseless death in a heartbeat!

I'm not sad or happy about the juvenile wildebeest, I'm content knowing of its existence, and its' place on this earth.

Anonymous
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"Cherylm" wrote:
I am new but want to thank you for this wonderful site
Welcome Cherylm! Laughing out loud

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"huskerkusker" wrote:
Who knows, guess he could've been left in hiding somewhere.

Very unlikely huskerkusker - wildebeest do not 'hide' their young - their best protection is to be within the herd.
Calves that are injured, or otherwise sickly, will, eventually, be taken out by predators and it is very likely that the wildebeest calf has succumbed to lions, hyaenas - or a leopard or cheetah.

It is a testament to it's mother's care that it actually lived as long as it did, considering that there is a new pride of lions and a 7+ -strong clan of hyaenas in the area.... not to speak about the leopards and cheetahs (and possibly wild dogs) that must also be close by.

Anonymous
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I am new but want to thank you for this wonderful site and opening a whole new world to me. Your hard work is very much appreciated. Just want to say Happy New Year. Also, thank you for the update on the injured baby. I was in awe of his spirit and determination to keep up with the herd even though my heart was breaking for him.

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