Wounded mother giraffe (moved from Nkorho Sightings Forum)

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Anonymous
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Wounded mother giraffe (moved from Nkorho Sightings Forum)

I don't see anything right now but did want to point out that the mother giraffe that was sighted yesterday with blood on her tail also had bloody wounds on the insides of her rear legs. The cam zoomed in on them so I'm assuming someone there knows about it - though I don't know if you intercede in such cases of injury.

Anonymous
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According to concise Britanica : If lions or hyenas attack, a mother sometimes stands over her calf, kicking at the predators with front and back legs. Cows have food and water requirements that may keep them away from the nursery group for hours at a time, and about half of very young calves are killed by lions and hyenas. Calves sample vegetation at three weeks but suckle for 18–22 months.

And according to kidcyber.com: Water holes are places where predators wait, and it is awkward for a giraffe to lower its head to drink. It has to spread its front legs wide to be able to get its head down. When its head is low, it is easier for predators to attack. Therefore, a giraffe only drinks about once a day, up to 40 litres each time. (note: wouldn't that be an ideal time for a hyena to grab a tail?)

Although giraffes are peaceful animals, they will defend themselves from lions, leopards and hyenas which attack the young, and sometimes adult giraffes. Giraffes give powerful kicks with all four legs, and a well placed kick can kill a lion.

And from AWF: Predators and Threats
Giraffe tails are highly prized by many African cultures. The desire for good-luck bracelets, fly whisks and thread for sewing or stringing beads have led people to kill the giraffe for its tail alone. Giraffes are easily killed and poaching (now more often for their meat and hide) continues today. (note: it says killed for their tails alone. Could someone just sneak up and cut the tail tassle off a giraffe when it wasn't looking?)

After reviewing this data does it make any more sense why I still stand firm in my belief that it was a hyena attack? Did we all forget there was one hyena and a cheetah at the WH, then four hyenas sighted playing in the WH the night before? My guess is that awful sound we heard after the cheetah and lone hyena left the hole could've been the attack on the giraffe. Although we can't be certain. An adult hyena's bite pressure can reach 50 kilograms per cm² (800 lb per square inch), allowing it to easily crush bone. So biting off a giraffe's tail could've happened quickly.

Call me crazy but we haven't seen any lions around the water hole lately have we?

And it's my honest opinion there are two giraffes with missing tail tassles. One tail is shorter than the other's. If you go back and look at the picture where she did finally let her calf nurse, you will see the calf is darker than the calf whose mother had the bloodless tail. That calf was much lighter and it appeared older and less wanting to stay that close to momma.

There is one more scenario that was just mentioned briefly... about the male trying to mate. Is there any chance even though she's still nursing her calf that she might've been in season and what we saw wasn't a fresh wound at all....?

Anyway, for what it's worth, I'm sticking with my original theory......hyena.

Anonymous
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Watching that video again of the 3 giraffes. Big one is male, then the mom and the baby. I think it looked like the male was trying to mate and the female was not allowing anything to touch her. Her wound looks fresh.

I have no idea how it happened, its all speculation. but I don't think she was clawed, I think the stump was causing the blood. They were at waterhing hold next day and she seemed fine and clean. the tail seemed to have clotted over.

Anonymous
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You can read this topic, it might help you for more info about the giraffe's wounds :
http://www.africam.com/boma/viewtopic.php?t=2577&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0

Anonymous
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followed the thread and didn't realize there was a missing tail tassle involved. i worked with a giraffe at our local zoo as a junior keeper years ago and i think it would be quite possible for a lion (probably inexperienced) to leap up and grab for giraffe haunch and get tail instead. one big whip around from the giraffe and lion and tail tassle would both be gone. btw, 'my' giraffe used to lean over his pen metal bars and lick the back of my neck.

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