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Snakes - Puff Adder

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Anonymous
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Snakes - Puff Adder

Thanks for the very interesting information. When we lived in South Africa I was told that Puffadders were responsible for more bites than all other snakes combined in the whole of Africa. Not sure how true this is either?

DrSnuggles's picture
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Joined: Jan 26 2007

Hello,

here some Photos from a Puff Adder (Bitis Arietans)

I found this Puff Adder at night on the Road in Mali , West Africa.

I made the Photos the next morning, so it was very cool, and that explains the back lying on one of the Photos.

As you see , in the Size Comparance with the Ciggarette Box, it is a very juvenile Animal.
(Sorry for the ciggy box, but I guess this is the best international Size Value, valid for metric and imperial) Cool

I linked the Photos here for you, as they are too big reg. the Forum regulations. But I believe, to leave them this Size to see the details of the Snake

http://img261.echo.cx/img261/8103/img46161dv.jpg

http://img261.echo.cx/img261/8008/img46197oe.jpg

http://img261.echo.cx/img261/9342/img46291ey.jpg

http://img261.echo.cx/img261/3862/img46208gp.jpg

I certainly released the snake, far from any populated area.

That was all back 06/2005. With some luck, the snake is still crawling, hissing and growing Laughing out loud

Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

Thanks Landi. I will do some research on the net too.

Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

"rooibokkie" wrote:
Thanks for the very interesting information. When we lived in South Africa I was told that Puffadders were responsible for more bites than all other snakes combined in the whole of Africa. Not sure how true this is either?

The Puffadder does account for most serious snakebites in Southern Africa due mainly to the fact that it relies on camoflage to escape detection rather than moving off into shelter, which means it can easily be stepped on. While considered to be sluggish, it strikes extremely fast and has very long fangs (up to 18mm).

Its venom is cytotoxic which is different to that of Mambas (neurotoxic). This means that tissue and blood cells are attacked, which may leave the area around the wound serously blistered and a person may loose a digit or limb.

Landi

Landi

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