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Whip-poor-will

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Whip-poor-will

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Whip-poor-will


Conservation status

Least Concern
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Aves

Order: Caprimulgiformes

Family: Caprimulgidae

Genus: Caprimulgus

Species: C. vociferus


Binomial name
Caprimulgus vociferus
Wilson, 1812
The Whip-poor-will or whippoorwill, Caprimulgus vociferus, is a medium-sized (22-27 cm) nightjar, a type of nocturnal bird. The Whip-poor-will is commonly heard within its range, but less often seen. It is named onomatopoetically after its call.

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This is a photo of the only Whip-poor-will Ive ever seen. It was in Toronto at Leslie Street Spit. My buddy Richard took me to see it. As its more active at night,it sat right still as I approached for decent photos.

This was in 2003,so Im glad I got a photo. We are nearish the northern most range in Toronto. Among the "goat suckers" we also see far more commonly Common Nighthawks.

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"Marlon" wrote:
"jilltx" wrote:
Whip-Poor-Wills, Poor -Wills, Chuck-Will's-Widow, Pauraque's, Nightjars, Nighthawks...we have many types here in the states. Whip-Poor-wills occur most often in the central-eastern US. They're calls are very similar to the bird I'm hearing in Africa (Fiery necked Nightjar??)

Cuckoos also make that lovely soft trilling sound. )

Cool! I am sure you'll find nightjar's all over the world!! That loud birdnoise you heard now, was a Brown-hooded Kingfisher!

My husband calls that bird the rooster of Nokorho. He says it wakes everyone up saying, "New Day, Get Up!!!" Just like a rooster crowing. lol

Anonymous
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"jilltx" wrote:
Whip-Poor-Wills, Poor -Wills, Chuck-Will's-Widow, Pauraque's, Nightjars, Nighthawks...we have many types here in the states. Whip-Poor-wills occur most often in the central-eastern US. They're calls are very similar to the bird I'm hearing in Africa (Fiery necked Nightjar??)

Cuckoos also make that lovely soft trilling sound. Smiling

Cool! I am sure you'll find nightjar's all over the world!! That loud birdnoise you heard now, was a Brown-hooded Kingfisher!

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http://www.kwic.com/~pagodavista/wiporwil.wav

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"ex-centric" wrote:
Goatsuckers » Hibernates during the winter instead of migrating, Its body temperature drops from 102°F (39°C) to 65°F (18.3°C), its breathing slows, and its digestion ceases until spring brings the return of the insects that constitute its diet. » They are protected by brown, gray, and black coloring, and their lax and fluffy feathers render their flight almost noiseless. » Most of the 70 or so goatsucker species dwell in tropical climes, and their number includes several birds in which the muted males undergo astonishing changes at courtship time. Name given for a family of nocturnal birds of an order Goatsucker that includes, the frogmouth and the oil bird. They are medium-sized birds and are found it in temperate and tropical areas of both hemispheres. The name Goatsucker is based on an ancient belief that these birds fed on goat's milk by night but their presence near such animals was no doubt due to the insects hovering about them. With their long the, pointed wings, weak feet, and small, wide gaping bills fringed with bristles , goat suckers have been called flying insect traps. Protected by brown, gray, and black coloring, and their lax and fluffy feathers render their flight almost noiseless. In England goatssuckers are called the Nightjars . The whippoorwill is common in the Eastern United States. Unlike other birds its hibernates during the winter instead of migrating. Its body temperature drops from 102 Fahrenheit 26.5 Fahrenheit, its breathing slows, and its digestion ceases until the return of spring, which brings the insects that constitutes its diet. The larger 12 in. chuck-will's widow is found in the South and the poorwill 7 in. in the West.

This is so interesting. I saw a whipporwhill one time. But I have heard its nighttime call all my life. I always assumed they migrated in winter. I had no idea they hibernated. I didn't even know birds could hibernate. Much less having one that does so in my own woods.
Thanks, now when I hear the lovely call of the whipporwhill it will seem even more special!!!

Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

Whip-Poor-Wills, Poor -Wills, Chuck-Will's-Widow, Pauraque's, Nightjars, Nighthawks...we have many types here in the states. Whip-Poor-wills occur most often in the central-eastern US.

They're calls are very similar to the bird I'm hearing in Africa (Fiery necked Nightjar??)

Cuckoos also make that lovely soft trilling sound. Smiling

Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

"Marlon" wrote:
"KeeKee" wrote:
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Whippoorwill) Jump to navigation, search Whip-poor-will


Conservation status

Least Concern
Scientific classification
Kingdom Animalia

Phylum Chordata

Class Aves

Order Caprimulgiformes

Family Caprimulgidae

Genus Caprimulgus

Species C. vociferus


Binomial name
Caprimulgus vociferus
Wilson, 1812
The Whip-poor-will or whippoorwill, Caprimulgus vociferus, is a medium-sized (22-27 cm) nightjar, a type of nocturnal bird. The Whip-poor-will is commonly heard within its range, but less often seen. It is named onomatopoetically after its call.

Interesting! Does it say where it occurs??

I don't know where else it occurs, but is a common here in E. Ky. It calls usually at night. And the call was so similar to the bird in Africa, I thought they might both be nightjars. Looking at pics. of both birds there are similarities also. Isn't that weird? 2 similar birds living half a world apart. Cousins probably!

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that was a page I found on wikapedia. They say it is not always accurate. But thought it interesting it did mention nighthar.

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Goatsuckers
» Hibernates during the winter instead of migrating, Its body temperature drops from 102°F (39°C) to 65°F (18.3°C), its breathing slows, and its digestion ceases until spring brings the return of the insects that constitute its diet.
» They are protected by brown, gray, and black coloring, and their lax and fluffy feathers render their flight almost noiseless.
» Most of the 70 or so goatsucker species dwell in tropical climes, and their number includes several birds in which the muted males undergo astonishing changes at courtship time.
Name given for a family of nocturnal birds of an order Goatsucker that includes, the frogmouth and the oil bird. They are medium-sized birds and are found it in temperate and tropical areas of both hemispheres. The name Goatsucker is based on an ancient belief that these birds fed on goat's milk by night but their presence near such animals was no doubt due to the insects hovering about them. With their long the, pointed wings, weak feet, and small, wide gaping bills fringed with bristles , goat suckers have been called flying insect traps. Protected by brown, gray, and black coloring, and their lax and fluffy feathers render their flight almost noiseless. In England goatssuckers are called the Nightjars . The whippoorwill is common in the Eastern United States. Unlike other birds its hibernates during the winter instead of migrating. Its body temperature drops from 102 Fahrenheit 26.5 Fahrenheit, its breathing slows, and its digestion ceases until the return of spring, which brings the insects that constitutes its diet. The larger 12 in. chuck-will's widow is found in the South and the poorwill 7 in. in the West.

Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

"KeeKee" wrote:
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Whippoorwill) Jump to: navigation, search Whip-poor-will


Conservation status

Least Concern
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Aves

Order: Caprimulgiformes

Family: Caprimulgidae

Genus: Caprimulgus

Species: C. vociferus


Binomial name
Caprimulgus vociferus
Wilson, 1812
The Whip-poor-will or whippoorwill, Caprimulgus vociferus, is a medium-sized (22-27 cm) nightjar, a type of nocturnal bird. The Whip-poor-will is commonly heard within its range, but less often seen. It is named onomatopoetically after its call.

Interesting! Does it say where it occurs??

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