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Schools are watching this LIVE..!

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Anonymous
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Schools are watching this LIVE..!

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=5963819082103009942
Good morning to you all. I have just signed up as a new member. Campell thank you for stepping me through this process. You may just see my name up there, but in fact, there are 32 adorable kids in a classroom watching all this. We have signed on here so the kids can ask all the questions they have been asking us, and we just don't have all the answers for them. Hopefully some of you will help them. So with tha said, THANK YOU Africacam for this wonderful and most educational experience. Not every day you wake up in Canada to a Giraffe walking across your PC monitor..!
I as yet do not know how to post pictures but did send the childrens classroom picture to Campbell Scott so he could see who all these kids are.

azlady13 (not verified)
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Ms. Charlie, is this where you want the list of home schoolers and how they do it? Or under Home School?  I'm confused! Smiling

Ann (not verified)
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Hi, Kids!  I discovered that in the All Things Wild Forum, there is a thread "Pictures taken during studytrip, Kenya" by Fabby.  I noticed in one of the pictures the road and soil was very red.  It looked like the iron ore mining pits we have here in northern MN.  From 1942-1968 there were also a few low grade ore mining pits in SE MN where I grew up.  For a time, they were mining some pits about 3 miles south of me and there was a crushing, processing plant just a few miles north of me.  I lived on the highway and 1/2 mile south of our farm, the huge ore dump trucks would turn onto the highway and would be shifting gears right at the end of our driveway.  A truck would go past every 3 minutes, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.  There are no lakes in SE MN, even though the state is famous as The Land of 10,000 Lakes.  We used to go swimming in the old iron ore pits.  Very dangerous!  Water that was spring fed and very cold and huge drop offs.  I was not a good swimmer and came close to drowning there one day!  If you are interested in learning anything about iron ore mining in MN, you can Google "Minnesota's Geology" a book by Richard W. Ojakangas, Charles L Matsch.  You will find a book review there.  Chapter 8, Metallic Minerals, on page 125 tells some about iron mining in MN and on page 132 mentions the mines near where I grew up.  Spring Valley, Ostrander, Etna and Chatfield.  While I was looking for other places that had red soil, I also found this website that has a lesson plan that you might like to do in your science classes.

https://www.soils.org/lessons/plans/lessons/color.html

Ann (not verified)
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Hi Kids!  I was trying to find out what makes that high pitched sound at night at the NK waterhole.  I thought it was a frog or toad, but it is probably an African Cicada.  Someone thought there must be a lot of them in the marula tree, sitting right near the mic.  They are rather quiet right at the moment.  Wonder if a leopard or other climbing cat is there right now?!  Anyway, this website has a long list of interesting facts about animals.  I don't know if I gave you this before or not.  When you get to the section that tells about the loudest, you will find that it says this cicada is almost as loud as a road drill!

http://www.g-kexoticfarms.com/funanimalfacts.html

There is a picture of one on this website:

http://www.entomon.net/locust-swarms-african-cicadas-at-107-decibels.htm m

Ann (not verified)
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Say Kids, are you working on a chart or graph that shows how tall each animal we see is compared to each other?  I noticed today that the National Geographic site has a big list of animals from all over the world.  Some of the ones I see there that we have seen at Nkorho are African Elephant, African Lion, African Wild Dog, Baboons, Cheetah, Egret, Giraffe, Hippo, Hyena, Impala, Leopard, Mongoose, Spotted Hyena, Squirrel, Vulture, Warthog, Wildebeest and Zebra.  Each animal article shows how big they are compared to a 6 foot tall man.  It also tells how tall each one is and how much they can weigh.  Some of the pages have sound clips too.  Maybe you could use the size drawing for each one and then put them all in order by height and you could also make a graph that shows them in order of weight too.  I would be interested to see that.  You maybe have already explored their entire site, but if you haven't here is the website for Facts, Information, Photos, Pictures, Sounds, Habitats, Reports, News

http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals

Ann (not verified)
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Ms Charlie, you started a number of forum topics "All things.......".  I see you have two separate ones for "following the Mapogo Pride" and "All things Nkuhuma Pride".  If you want some more about lions in general, this site has lots of information.  It has interesting pictures of their teeth too!

http://www.predatorconservation.com/lion.htm

Tabs (not verified)
Anonymous's picture

Cynthia

I agree entirely with the view of Born Free, on the suspect value of certain zoos and wildlife parks in our modern society - and have expressed the same views myself on many occasions.

However, the arguments for keeping wild animals in captivity that some Zoo organisations (such as the London Zoological Society, among others) put forward are difficult to dispute - in that they do valuable work towards the conservation and the preservation of endangered species.

Certain species of Rhino - just one example - would now be extinct in the wild if it were not for the extensive research and breeding programmes that have been carried out, over many years, by zoos around the world, who work in conjunction with projects in the countries where these animal naturally occur.

There are too many zoos which are only interested in making money - and use their existence as an excuse that children will not learn about wildlife if they were not there - but there are a few whose intentions are very credible and whose research efforts results in the saving of many animal species.

I suggest that anyone who is planning to visit a zoo does some research beforehand to ascertain whether they perform valuable conservation work and whether the conditions the animals are kept in are acceptable.

 

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africlub
Joined: Feb 18 2006

** AFRICAM - BOOK (3) ADD YOUR PAN CAM PHOTOS

THIS  SITE HAS   ANIMAL  FACTS AND SIGHTINGS AT THE

 NKORHO WATER HOLE AREA - THE KIDS  MIGHT GET

SOME INFORMATION IN HERE ON AFRICA ANIMALS  ETC

http://www.africam.com/wildlife/africam_book_3_add_your_pan_cam_photos

cynthiab (not verified)
Anonymous's picture

This is an opinion written in response to the tiger killing in SF zoo. I thought it would be a great discussion in your class. Just think...think...what we could do in the wild with all the money spent in this country to build bigger & stronger cages.

You kids can help make a different world. Smiling

Comment by Adam M. Roberts, Senior Vice President, Born Free USA
Tiger incident in San Francisco should lead to national debate on wild animals in captivity - 3 hours ago

The tiger mauling at the San Francisco Zoo is a tragedy, indeed, and my heart goes out to the victims and their families. But sadly, it’s not an unexpected tragedy, and that’s one of the most frustrating aspects of this story.

For years I’ve watched case after case of wild animals escaping their enclosures, injuring, or even killing people.  This happens at zoos, circuses, and when exotic animals are kept as pets.  Lions, tigers, primates, elephants and other species have been involved in these unfortunate incidents, and we all pay a steep price.

Do wild animals belong in captivity in America?  In a word, no. There is no overarching and conclusive educational benefit to keeping wild animals in captivity, and our collective focus must be the conservation of species in the wild.

In captivity, animals are kept in unnatural surroundings, in artificial physical and (often) social environments with little mental and physical stimulation. What is the educational benefit of seeing an animal exhibited in such a way that is dramatically removed from reality in the wild?  The Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ own research acknowledges that "Little to no systematic research has been conducted on the impact of visits to zoos and aquariums on visitor conservation knowledge, awareness, affect, or behavior." Zoo visitors spend minutes at best—often just seconds—at an exhibit glancing at an animal. Perhaps there is some signage on the cage; perhaps it is more than a few bullet points.  This is not educational.  This is entertainment; and dubious entertainment at that.

And what of conservation? Tens of millions of dollars can be spent altering enclosures—with little practical effect for the animals. But that same money invested in conservation in the wild places where animals live naturally would reap benefits for years to come. $10 million dollars invested in anti-poaching efforts around Mount Kenya, for instance, could fund vital, life-saving conservation initiatives into the next Century!  In an American urban zoo that’s maybe a single, modest animal enclosure.  Put the money into the wild… that’s real conservation.

I understand quite well the allure of seeing wild animals up close.  Tigers, elephants, and many other species are awesome to behold.  But we don’t all have the right to behold them in person—especially at any cost.  There is a grave cost to the animals—the innocent victims in this situation—and potentially a grave cost to any humans who are harmed by coming in close contact with these wild animals.

The time has come to recognize that wildlife belongs in the wild. The cost of keeping wild animals in captivity is too great. Parents should engage their kids at libraries, with movies, and on the internet, to truly learn about wild animals.  And visit sites such as http://www.bornfreeusa.org to learn why we believe every American should be a compassionate conservationist!

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africlub
Joined: Feb 18 2006

Hello everyone from Africam,

Since two weeks we are watching Africam in our classroom as a part of our Africa Project...
During the day and between classes the children of this class watch the cam with loads of peasure...
For the ten children in the age from 11 to 15 it is a very motivating way of experiencing Africa in a way most of us never did before.... It brings this project to another level!!

Thanks for the oppertunity and helping us showing Africa in real life other than books and pictures...

Mr. Paul and the students of class SO5

 

School Kids

Greetings,
I am busy trying to get things up and running for our elementary school here. We are planning an Arficam party early some AM before
school starts and hope for animals (like today, wow was it active).
Busy trying to get through all the
computer problems though, "Media Inactive" being the biggest one.
I am getting there, slowly but surely and hope to have the students tuned in within a week or so.
I am having way too much fun with this not to share it with the little ones. Smiling

 

School Kids
hey gurl (: School Kids

Africam is pretty awesome!

Cool

Ms Charlie's picture
Educational Video's School Kids

 

Ground Hornbill:

 

Ms Charlie's picture
Home School School Kids

 

I have been asked many times on here, what do I think about homeschooling.

I would like to with your help, start a list on here of Parents who are homeschooling and how they are doing it. Any of you who are teaching your children at home full or part time, I would really like to hear about the process. There are many on here actually who would like to as well.

So fire away, we have a lot of interest in it in the PM's but lets get it out on the forum and in this thread, and see what we can ALL do to help those who want to take this challenge on, ' home schooling '.

 

Ms Charlie's picture
You know your addicted to the water hole, when..! School Kids

I would love to start a thread here of how all this has effected each of you. It's the humor of all this I am tying to capture. If you would please, could you ask yourselves....you know your addicted to the water hole, when..! and finish the sentence. Have fun...Smiling

You know your addicted to the water hole...When your husbands walks through the door after a long day at work, and finds you still sitting in front of the monitor with your Pj's still on.

Hello from Alphen a/d Rijn, The Netherlands School Kids

Hello everyone from Africam,

Since two weeks we are watching Africam in our classroom as a part of our Africa Project...
During the day and between classes the children of this class watch the cam with loads of peasure...
For the ten children in the age from 11 to 15 it is a very motivating way of experiencing Africa in a way most of us never did before.... It brings this project to another level!!

Thanks for the oppertunity and helping us showing Africa in real life other than books and pictures...

Mr. Paul and the students of class SO5

Hello from Vermont School Kids

Greetings,
I am busy trying to get things up and running for our elementary school here. We are planning an Arficam party early some AM before
school starts and hope for animals (like today, wow was it active).
Busy trying to get through all the
computer problems though, "Media Inactive" being the biggest one.
I am getting there, slowly but surely and hope to have the students tuned in within a week or so.
I am having way too much fun with this not to share it with the little ones. Smiling

Hello from Ontario, Canada! School Kids

Hello, My name's Cassie, I'm 15 years old and I'm from Ontario, Canada. I just love this site and watching all the animals. I once saw my school's guidance counselor watching the camera when I walked by her office once day. I really enjoy watching the camera and all of its amazing animals. I really love photography and I want to, hopefully, be a photographer for a horse magazine or maybe even National Geographic. I'm always watching the Nation Geographiuc channel and discovery and I love seeing the shows where it's in Africa and other places like that.

MrsRex4thgrade's picture
Hello from West Texas School Kids

Hello from the 4th grade science classes of Mrs. Rex in Odessa, Texas. We have really enjoyed seeing the different animals on the africam. Thanks so much for sharing.

We are in the process of making a powerpoint presentation of the animals we see in our part of Texas. As soon as it is ready we will gladly share it.

WildlifeCampus's picture

Ms Charlie (not verified)
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azlady13's picture
Posts: 1627
Joined: 2007-06-29
Location: Phoenix Arizona USA
new
cerinthe wrote:
Azlady, what a beautiful dog Smiling

I think so too.  I have no idea who the owner is.  You see, the story goes like this.  MJ and I have been spending lots of time with Africam.  Today he worked for several hours using the site.  So tonight when we were talking about sending pictures to Ms Charlie for her kids, we happened to be driving down the road when he saw this dog.....in rush hour traffic.  He hollered to turn around and go back to take a picture of the lion!  It seems every animal now looks like it's from Africa to him!  So we turned around, I pulled over where the man was walking his dog and MJ got out with my cell phone and the man let him pose the dog for photos.  The photo on here was the result of that.  Not too bad considering the circumstances and equipment used.

____________________________

"You must be the change you wish to see in the world" -Ghandi

Mhala (Impala) Junior Sentry 

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