Rhino Poaching

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daffy taffy's picture
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Rhino Poaching

Have you guys read the article in National Geographic?  This is just part

of it.  The magazine has a 5 or 6 page article.  March 2012.  They are

cutting off the horns of some of the rhino's in order to prevent them

from being to "tempting" to poachers, and to stop them from fighting or

injuring people.  The article says the rhino's horns will grow back in

about 2 years.

Do you think these people are selling these horns to the

Chinese for medicine, just like poachers do? OMG  its horrible.  There

is one picture of a rhino carcass hanging in a meat locker waiting to

be salted down.  If you have a weak stomach don't look at it.

 

They are moving them out of the

wild and onto game reserves to make money.  There is one photo in

the magazine where the rhino is being moved by helicopter, and it

is hanging upside down head towards the ground.  They look desolate

after they remove their horns.  Why is this being allowed to happen?

Janine's picture
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daffy taffy wrote:

Thanks Janine.  You have addressed alot of my concerns and answered

alot of my questions also.  Thanks for easing my mind a little.  I love

rhinos.

My appologies for late reply but I have been away you are most welcome daffy glad I could help

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Daffy join in the petitions Save the Rhino awareness, you will found them on FB, i do hope this is alright to post on here.

Doris

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africlubmodsquad
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Hi Daffy,

Africam, most lodges in Sabi Sands and other parts of South Africa are taking a "better safe than sorry" approach to locating rhinos for poachers. Here is their current policy regarding rhinos:

Due to the ongoing problem with rhino poaching, Africam has taken the following steps... "We have asked that real time sightings of rhino NOT be posted on FB or the forum but we have implemented additional measures. One of those is that we will keep the cameras away from rhino for all our cameras. Please respect the decisions of Zoomies when you think there may be some critter around but the camera is not moving there."

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Daffy this is the Africam statement on your question.

Due to the ongoing problem with poaching Africam has taken the following "We have already asked that real time sightings of rhino NOT be posted on FB but we have implemented additional measures. One of those is that we will keep the cameras away from rhino for all our cameras. So please respect the decisions of Zoomies when u think there may be some critter around but the camera is not moving there"

daffy taffy's picture
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I have another question?  Can you tell me why rhinos aren't shown on

the cam and how this discourages poachers?

daffy taffy's picture
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Thanks Janine.  You have addressed alot of my concerns and answered

alot of my questions also.  Thanks for easing my mind a little.  I love

rhinos.

Janine's picture
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Hi Taffy

The reason they transport them upside down is that the straps under their arms and legs would put huge pressure on their organs due to their weight, they are transported for a very short distance it takes no more than four mins max to get them from their drop location to the awaiting trucks where they wake them immediately and walk them into the trucks, this is a minimal stress and no injury method of moving them, it is mainly black rhino that are moved this way as their habitat is thick bush, unlike the white rhino counterpart who is a grazer and prefers the open plains as their habitat, which makes it possible to get the transport trucks in close to them for capture.

re the release of ivory comment above,  yes if you read my initial reply to you in full, you will find the answer to that comment in there

No the actual de horning done by rhino farmers is nowhere like what the poachers do. With normal de horning they just saw off the horn close to the base, without injuring the rhino, the horn is made of keratin, same as our hair and nails this does not hurt the rhino.  The risk of anaesthetic is real and this cannot be done without anesthetising the rhino, as the rhino will attack the person trying to saw off his horn and quite rightly so on his part.  Large mammals have a higher risk of not recovering from a full anaesthetic.

The pics you are referring too with the blood,   those are rhino which were attacked by poachers, and not the rhino farmers.

Here is a very good paper to read on the pitfalls of dehorning rhino if you are interested

http://www.rhinoresourcecenter.com/pdf_files/117/1175856639.pdf

Another article on the selling of rhino horn which is in my blog

http://scorerjanineblog.blogspot.com/2011/10/points-to-ponder-when-you-think-that.html

Daffy in South Africa we are working very hard to try and eradicate the scourge of rhino poaching, things are not as simple as they seem, but take hart in the fact that we spend many man hours working on this problem here in South Africa it is not taken lightly, the same goes for the rest of Southern Africa either.

This is a subject that can fill pages and pages in this thread.

The main thing we are calling for is a total ban on any rhino hunting, and the total ban on the sale of rhino horn.  That way we know any rhino horn in the market is totally illegal.

We are receiving opposition on this from hunters and rhino horn farmers who have stock piles, if you read the articles on my blog you will see why even farming rhino for their horns and "flooding" the market won’t work, as in this instance if you look at the numbers the demand will always exceed the supply.

Besides the fact that it is incredibly cruel to the rhino to de horn.

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daffy taffy's picture
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I respect the native peoples of these countries.  There culture, beliefs, traditional medicine.  I have nothing against the people themselves.  I just fear for the rhinos.  We have watched them here on the cams for years, and rhino siting has always been so wonderful.  I've grown to love and respect these armored, ugly, and yes, somewhat mean critters, and I'm horrified that it has got to this point.  I have been such a firm believer in conservationism, and I still am.  I wish there was some way this could be stopped and humans and rhinos could live in peace together. The rhinos need their horns.  No one else needs them as much as they do.

daffy taffy's picture
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Hi Janine

Well yes it does help some.  I haven't read the entire article, just parts of it.

Why do they transport the rhinos upside down like that?  Even if they are tranquilized what keeps all the blood from leaving their extremities and rushing

to their brains?

Talking about releasing a little bit of legalized ivory and rhino horn into the Asian markets, doesn't that just whet the appetite of the buyers of it?

I'm concerned about the mental and physical effects that this has on the animal

itself.  This de-horning leaves a huge bloody looking sore on the rhinos snout and they

seem to get depressed and sick.  They sometimes die from it.  Do you know anything about the health risks that all this does to a dwindling rhino population? If the poachers   Would just stop and think that there might never be another rhino to de-horn or kill, do you think they would consider what the consequences ultimately of this could mean?  I mean not just jail time or a fine if that was enforced...but the complete erradication of an animal that has probably roamed the planet for a very long time.  OMG what if this

is like the wooly mammoths?

Janine's picture
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Dafft "They are moving them out of the

wild and onto game reserves to make money.  There is one photo in

the magazine where the rhino is being moved by helicopter, and it

is hanging upside down head towards the ground.  They look desolate

after they remove their horns.  Why is this being allowed to happen?"

 

They are not moving those rhino out of the wild, in fact none of the wild rhino have been moved, it has been rhino who were on small farms that were moved to areas of better security

The photograph you are refering to was a re location of black rhino from the Eastern Cape to Limpopo province to a very large private game reserve, those rhino were part of a wild breeding expansion project run by Jaques Flamand a very well known conservationist who has had excellent sucess in increasing the numbers of black rhino in the wild with this project (Black rhino are still on the critically endangered list unlike the white rhino which is only classified as endangered at the moment)

They move the rhino out of very thick bush areas where truck cannot get in to load them, it is a very quick and kind method of moving the black rhino out of the thick bush for trans location they are mildly sedated for the trip to ensure that they suffer minimal stress.

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