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Was That a Black Rhino?

Anonymous's picture
Was That a Black Rhino?

A rare sighting for us... a Black Rhinoceros on the Tembe cam. After testing the water, both he and his buddy the oxpecker settled in for a nice wallowing. The name of the species was chosen to distinguish it from the White Rhinoceros, however this alone is very misleading. The White Rhino isn't white,  in fact neither of the two are really distinguishable by color. The word white in the name "White Rhinoceros" is a mistranslation of the Dutch word wijd for wide, referring to its square upper lip. The Black Rhinoceros has a pointed or hooked lip.  
It’s one of the two species of Rhinos native to Africa, the other being the White Rhinoceros that we often see on the cams. The Black Rhino's range includes Southern and Eastern areas of Africa. There are less than 4,000 Black Rhino left in the wild. That's a dramatically low number considering there were  approximately 70,000 of them back in the 1960's.  Due to loss of habitat and poaching, the Black Rhino has seen the most drastic decline of all rhino species. Conservation efforts are helping to stabilize the slowly rising number, but tremendous effort is still needed to secure the future for this magnificent animal. The West African Black Rhino, one of four subspecies of Black Rhino is tentatively declared extinct. Extinct...a very scary word in the animal kingdom.
Consider yourself lucky when you get a glimpse of the Black Rhino, he truly is a sight to behold.

Check this link for pictures of the Black Rhino along with other daily sightings-  http://www.africam.com/wildlife/camerapicturesmonday17january2011

 

daffy taffy's picture

Thanks for letting us know

Thanks for letting us know about the black rhino sighting.  Thats what every one of us likes to hear

that they are still around and making a comeback.

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