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Who am i #20

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dan loves zebras's picture
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Joined: Oct 2 2006
Who am i #20

I am a reptile and found in Asia, my siliva has so much bacteria in it it can kill a buffalo... my relatives do not exist but are in legends and fairytales but what could i possible be???

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dan.

dan loves zebras's picture
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Joined: Oct 2 2006

Yep well done both of you will do another one later on Smiling

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dan.

Iceage (not verified)
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I think i have to agree with the answer that Pheonix did on this one SurprisedWink

 

Pheonix's picture
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Joined: Nov 8 2007

 I am a Komodo Dragon

 

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Komodo dragon[1]
Conservation status Scientific classification Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Order: Squamata
Suborder: Scleroglossa
Family: Varanidae
Genus: Varanus
Species: V. komodoensis
Binomial name Varanus komodoensis
Ouwens, 1912[2] Komodo dragon distribution
Komodo dragon distribution

The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) is a species of lizard that inhabits the islands of Komodo, Rinca, Flores, and Gili Motang in Indonesia.[3] A member of the monitor lizard family (Varanidae), it is the largest living species of lizard, growing to an average length of 2 to 3 metres (6.6 to 9.8 ft) and weighing around 70 kilograms (150 lb). Their unusual size is attributed to island gigantism, since there are no other carnivorous animals to fill the niche on the islands where they live, and also to the Komodo dragon's low metabolic rate.[4][5] As a result of their size, these lizards dominate the ecosystems in which they live.[6] Although Komodo dragons eat mostly carrion, they will also hunt and ambush prey including invertebrates, birds, and mammals.

Mating begins between May and August, and the eggs are laid in September. About twenty eggs are deposited in abandoned megapode nests and incubated for seven to eight months, hatching in April, when insects are most plentiful. Young Komodo dragons are vulnerable and therefore dwell in trees, safe from predators and cannibalistic adults. They take around three to five years to mature, and may live as long as fifty years. They are among the rare vertebrates capable of parthenogenesis, in which females may lay viable eggs if males are absent.[7]

Komodo dragons were discovered by Western scientists in 1910. Their large size and fearsome reputation make them popular zoo exhibits. In the wild their range has contracted due to human activities and they are listed as vulnerable by the IUCN. They are protected under Indonesian law, and a national park, Komodo National Park, was founded to aid protection efforts.

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